Skip to content

What’s new on the farm

June 21, 2015

It’s been a while since my last post and I wanted to share a few pictures from the farm. We are conducting a lot of experiments this year since we are taking the year off from growing for market. One thing I have learned is that taking a year off does not mean we have no work to do….in fact, there is likely more work since we got so far behind this spring and are having to play catch up. When you don’t grow veggies, something else moves in to take root in all that beautiful soil. Weeds are in abundance and have set their roots, spread their seeds and taken over the plot at Lark. We planted a bunch of sunflowers and a bed of carrots. A few weeks ago I decided to clean up 4 beds near the hoop house and plant greens. I should have left the soil for a week or 2 to let the weed seeds germinate, then weed them out and then plant, but I didn’t. And, the results are horrendous….lots of weeds along with the beautiful greens. The greens have also been heavily hit by flea beetles so they are all filled with holes. I may have to just start over with that area.

We are enjoying rhubarb and had a lovely spring crop of asparagus. The herbs are all in full swing and make a lovely addition to almost every meal and drinks. Tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers are off to a great start in the hoop house. More pics of all this to come.

Today, I planted a bed of okra and sweet potatoes. My hope with the latter is that the vines will shade out any new weeds and we’ll also get some sweet potatoes out of the deal. Thanks to Bruce C. for the awesome slips and okra starts he gifted us.

Farm

Not sure what these are. They were here when we got the house and are in full bloom adding brilliant color to the yard.

IMG_20150621_192031

Mint

IMG_20150621_192100

Flowering sage

IMG_20150621_191624

A few volunteer sunflowers in the garlic bed. Don’t have the heart to pull them.

IMG_20150621_191641

Onion patch – red, white and shallots

IMG_20150621_191704

Volunteer potatoes in the onions and leeks

IMG_20150621_191748

Squash in the hugelkultur bed

Spring update

March 29, 2015

After another long, cold winter, we are coming out of hibernation. February is said to have been one of the coldest on record and I’m all too happy to see it go, though old man winter is a reluctant traveler and seems to be wearing out his welcome in March as well.

This year we plan to focus on infrastructure and soil building at our home plot and do not have plans for going to market or growing for market. Of course, we will still have a home garden and will experiment with a few new plants. We also hope to add some perennials to the mix, including raspberries and perhaps figs. The decision not to market farm this year was not an easy one. We are both working full-time jobs and have a new family member. We are fostering a 6 month old baby boy. Last year we became licensed foster parents and the experience has been incredibly rewarding, albeit somewhat frustrating (due to the situation not the baby – he’s great!). So, that new responsibility takes up quite a bit of time and market farming is just not realistic this year. Though, I still can’t stop myself from getting excited by the beginning of spring, one of my favorite times of year. I love seeing the bulbs emerge from the soil and hear the birds chirping. And, we have started seeds in the basement. Here are a few pics of spring in these parts:

Winter killed cover crop of oats and peas make a nice ground cover to keep weeds at bay.

Winter killed cover crop of oats and peas makes a nice ground cover to keep weeds at bay.

Deer scat...not a welcome sign.

Deer scat…not a welcome sign.

Rhubarb crown coming to life!

Rhubarb crown coming to life!

So excited to see the garlic coming up. This was planted last fall (early November).

So excited to see the garlic coming up. This was planted last fall (early November).

We are keeping the plot in Lakewood and will put it under cover crop. We are confident that our soil is a living system and want to keep it that way. Putting in a cover crop will keep out the weeds and build the soil structure even more, especially after nearly 5 years of intensive growth there.

Butternut squash…from saved seeds

September 29, 2014

Last year we saved some seeds from one of our butternut squashes and early in the season I planted them in tiny pots in the basement. Those 15 seeds turned into about 100 squash! So exciting to watch them grow through the season. And, right now, with this warm spell, they are continuing to flower and put on new fruit.

A couple weeks after being transplanted.

A couple weeks after being transplanted.

They started to take over the potatoes at one point.

They started to take over the potatoes at one point.

Late September.

Late September

Ready to harvest

Ready to harvest

Cover cropping – oats and peas, please!

September 27, 2014

The new area in our backyard now has a nice cover crop mix of peas and oats. In late June we planted buckwheat, which matured through the season and was cut and tilled in during the month of August. After that Spink drilled in the mix of oats and peas, which will fix nitrogen, build a nice deep root system and winter kill leaving great organic matter behind. There is still quite a bit of buckwheat in there too and we think that will be okay. The condition of this soil is so much more amazing than that of our Lark plot. We are super excited for growing veggies in here next spring!

Mix of peas and oats

Mix of peas and oats

Buckwheat patch makes a great pollinator habitat

July 27, 2014

Wow, the buckwheat we put in as a cover crop has reached ~3 feet tall and is full of pollinators. It is just an awesome experience to both watch and listen to all the activities by bees and other insects now that the buckwheat is flowering. There are so many honeybees out there! We put the buckwheat in as a cover crop to help build this area of land that we plan to plant veggies in next spring. The buckwheat is a rapid growth weed suppressor that also helps make nutrients more available to plants, particularly phosphorus. As it breaks down in the soil, it releases these nutrients. It also attracts lots of beneficial insects.

One of our honeybees (I believe)

One of our honeybees (I believe)

Another honeybee

Another honeybee

Bumblebee

Bumblebee

Yellow jacket

Yellow jacket

Hugelkultur bed

July 16, 2014

Another experiment! We built a hugelkultur bed in the back yard. This is a raised bed that is composed of dead wood, grass clippings, sod and dirt. The benefits of this type of bed include nutrients from the composting materials, water retention, and aerated soil. Right now we are trying to grow cucumbers in the bed. Will post an updated picture of them in a few weeks.

Logs are at the base of the trench and covered with grass clippings.

Logs are at the base of the trench and covered with grass clippings.

We used the rotary plow to throw the dirt on top.

We used the rotary plow to throw the dirt on top.

The final bed with cucumbers planted and wood chips around the base.

The final bed with cucumbers planted and wood chips around the base.

July 4th update

July 2, 2014

Summer is definitely here and the high temps are in full swing. Luckily we have also had intermittent rain storms, so most everything is growing super well. Here are a few pics showing the progress to date at the homestead. The small patch we planted in the spring is wild like a jungle and the newly turned soil is sporting a cover crop of buckwheat in the hopes that we build the soil structure, add biomass, and shade out weed growth. And, our first attempts at sunflowers and celery seem to be progressing smoothly.

W. 114th plot - the tilled part in the back has a cover crop of buckwheat just emerging.

W. 114th plot – the tilled part in the back has a cover crop of buckwheat just emerging.

The potatoes, squash, tomatoes, cukes and sunflowers have turned into a field of green.

The potatoes, squash, tomatoes, cukes and sunflowers have turned into a field of green.

Sunflowers about to burst any day now!

Sunflowers about to burst any day now! They follow the sun…it’s so cool.

First attempt at growing celery.

First attempt at growing celery.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 299 other followers

%d bloggers like this: